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You get to the end of the interview, the tough questions are over, and now it’s your turn to ask some questions. Asking good questions is not only an opportunity to learn about the job, it’s a chance to impress the interviewer with your interest and make a final connection with the interviewer.

There are many good questions to ask at this point, such as questions about current projects, the duties of the position, or what the interviewer has enjoyed most about his work. These questions will show interest and will give you more insight about the job. The problem is that they may not make you stand out from the rest of the pack who are likely asking similar questions. Then there are some more bold questions that, while risky, could potentially pay off big.  Here are three examples:              

Is there any reason you wouldn’t hire me?

This one has a big risk, but also a big upside. Interviews are the ideal time to address any concerns the interviewer may have about you. The problem is the interviewer may not be upfront about these concerns. You may leave the interview feeling it went great only to receive a rejection letter days later. Asking the interviewer “is there any reason you wouldn’t hire me?” puts all the cards on the table. The interviewer has a chance to point out any lingering concerns they may have about your suitability for the position.  This allows you to then address these concerns before they end up costing you the job.  Asking the question can also show assertiveness and confidence.

At the same time, the question can come across to some interviewers as insecure or defensive.  It can also put the interviewer on the spot and make them uncomfortable.

It is important to get a feel for the particular job and particular interviewer.  In a more relaxed job interview, this question could be the difference in putting you over the top.  In a more formal setting, the question could be off-putting and end up hurting more than it helps.

 Where do I stand in comparison with the other candidates for the position?

Along the same lines, this question can come across as either confident or unconformable depending on the feel of the interview. The upside of this question is that it gives you a better sense of what the company is looking for and allows you to address any shortcomings you may have in relation to the other candidates. 

Once I’m an employee, how would I be able to exceed your expectations?

Beyond showing confidence and interest in success, this question allows the interviewer to explain what the company is looking for and gives you the chance to show that you possess these traits.

As with the other two questions, it is important to get a feel for the interview to the question comes off as confident and interested rather than brash and uncomfortable.

At Job Store Staffing, we have the expertise to help you with all aspects of your job search. If you are looking for a position in the Denver area, be sure to contact us today.

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